2014 Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang

2014 Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang

Hurry! Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang has reached the markets & is now available for sale with the retailer near you.

If the same is not available in your area, you can directly SMS us your order.

Just Send an SMS on 09827250509 with your:-
Name,
Complete Address, Pincode,
Quantity of Panchang Required,
Contact details like Mobile No. & Email id

Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang 2014 has an MRP of Rs. 36
Rs. 55 for 1 Panchang of 2014
Rs. 80 for 2 Panchangs of 2014
Rs. 110 for 3 Panchangs of 2014
The above charges are inclusive of postage charges within India.
Your order will be sent via post (VPP), which has Cash-on-Delivery facility.

SMS your Order to Shri Satish Agrawal Ji @ 09827250509.

Agar aapko ye panchang pasand hai to apnay doston, rishtedaaro ko iss panchang ki khoobiyo ke baare me avashya batayien.

We request you to keep updating us with ur Feedbacks and suggestions on the Product, its contents, its reach/availability, and what changes/amendments you would like to see in the next issue.

Online Lala Ramswaroop Panchang 2013, Almanac

Hello,

Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang 2013 is now ONLINE and available to esteemed consumers like you for FREE.

1. Just Open this link

http://anax1em.pressmart.com/ LalaRamswaroopRamnarayanPancha ng

2. Click on “FREE Register here”.
3. Fill in the small form and click submit. (You need to enter 8 digit password, keep it very simple so that you can easily remember it).
4. Check your Email after 5 minutes and click on the activation link for Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang 2013. After Activation, soon another email will be sent which will have your password (which you entered while filing the form, in case you forget, you just have to check your email).
5. Open the above link again, and enter your Email id and password.
6. Click on the “Read Latest issue”.

• It takes a few minutes to load completely, be patient.
• You can Adjust the Zoom level to be able to read very easily.
• Press F on Keyboard to enter full screen.
• Use Single click and Double click to Zoom-in and Zoom-out.
• Each new registration requires a unique email id, i.e. re-registration from the same email is not possible.
• There is a SHARE option as well at the top. Use it to Share with your friends on Facebook/Twitter and other social networking places for FREE.
• The compressed PDF file of the panchang can also be downloaded using the ‘save’ button. You may need the unzip software, which can be freely downloaded from internet.
• Do give your feedback, what new changes you wish. Visit http://www.lalaramswaroop.com and fill the testimonial form.
• Understand your Panchang, click on this link http://www.lalaramswaroop.com/index.php/information

Enjoy the Free 2013 Online Panchang. In future the Online Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang 2014 may have some nominal charges.

Have a Nice and Green Day!

Shrey Agrawal
09827066211

Prahalad Agrawal (Editor)
09301413131

What are the different seasons as per hindu calendar?

Traditionally India has six seasons (rtu), each comprised of two months. The six seasons are:

  • Vasanta (spring, March to May)
  • Grisma (summer, May to July)
  • Varsha (rainy, July to September)
  • Sharad (autumn, September to November)
  • Hemanta (winter, November to January) and
  • Shishira (cool, January to March)

Another aspect of the lunar calendar is that its twelve months based on the lunar days (tithis) contain about 354 days. Just like, every 4th year an extra day is added on the solar calendar to make up for the discrepancy in the earth’s orbit around the sun (leap year system), an extra month is added to the lunar calendar every 30 months. This leap-month (adika-masa) is generally inserted after the months of Asadha orSravana and is called either a second Asadha or Sravana. Thus every second or third year contains 13 months in the lunar calendar. This of course contributes considerably to differences between the lunar and solar calendars. The consequences of these differences makes it hard to reconcile the dates from one calendar to the other without intricate calculations, especially in deciding the dates of various festivals. Your Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang serves the purpose of connecting the lunar calendar dates with that of solar calendar dates.

What are the hindu months?

The Hindu year contains twelve lunar months named after the naksatra in which the moon is full:

  • Chaitra (March – April) (citra-naksatra)
  • Vaisakha (April – May) (visakha-naksatra)
  • Jyaistha (May – June) (jyestha-naksatra)
  • Ashada (June – July) (purvasadha-naksatra)
  • Sravana (July – August) (sravana-naksatra)
  • Bhadrapada (August – September) (purva-bhadrapada-naksatra)
  • Ashwina (September – October) (asvini-naksatra)
  • Karttika (October – November) (krttika-naksatra)
  • Margasirsa or Agrahayana (November – December) (mrgasirsa-naksatra)
  • Pausa (December – January) (pusya-naksatra)
  • Magha (January – February) (magha-naksatra) and
  • Phalguna (February – March) (phalguna-naksatra).

Different parts of India start the year during different months. In general the year begins either in the month of Chaitra or in the autumnal month of Karttika.

Another aspect of the lunar calendar is that its twelve months based on the lunar days (tithis) contain about 354 days. Just like, every 4th year an extra day is added on the solar calendar to make up for the discrepancy in the earth’s orbit around the sun (leap year system), an extra month is added to the lunar calendar every 30 months. This leap-month (adika-masa) is generally inserted after the months of Asadha orSravana and is called either a second Asadha or Sravana. Thus every second or third year contains 13 months in the lunar calendar. This of course contributes considerably to differences between the lunar and solar calendars. The consequences of these differences makes it hard to reconcile the dates from one calendar to the other without intricate calculations, especially in deciding the dates of various festivals. Your Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang serves the purpose of connecting the lunar calendar dates with that of solar calendar dates.

What are yogas? What is a karna?

Yoga is the period during which the joint motion of the sun and the moon totals to 13 °20′. There are 27 Yogams. Each Yogam has a characteristic associated with it.

 

A karana is half of a tithi in duration. A karana is the time required for the angular distance between the sun and the moon to increase in steps of 6° starting from 0°. There are eleven karanas in total. Of the eleven karanas, four are fixed and occurs only once in a cycle. The remaining 7 karanas repeat eight times to cover the remaining 56 steps

There are two karanas in each tithi. In total there are eleven karanas that rotate through the 30 tithis that make up the lunar month.

Both a karana and a yoga are similar to a tithi in the sense that they are all a measure of the relationship between the sun and moon. A tithi has 12 degrees of longitudinal separation between the sun and moon, the yoga is the combined longitudinal motion of the sun and the moon and the karana is half the tithi. In Hindu astrology the sun and the moon are both perceived to have a great effect on life, and their motions are precisely calculated.

What are the Days of the week (Varas)?

The second element of the Hindu panchanga is the day, vara. In Sanskrit the days of the week are clearly named after seven major astrological influences:

  • Sunday, the sun, ravi-vara
  • Monday, the moon, soma-vara
  • Tuesday, Mars, mangala-vara
  • Wednesday, Mercury, budha-vara
  • Thursday, Jupiter, guru-vara
  • Friday, Venus sukra-vara
  • Saturday, Saturn, sani-vara

What is a Tithi?

As per the Indian Hindu Calendar, Tithi (also spelled Thithi) is the lunar date. Tithi is one of the most important aspect of the Indian Almanac or the Panchang and therefore many Hindu festivals and ceremonies are based on Tithi Calendar. A lunar calendar is based on the moon’s rotation around the Earth. A tithi is the time taken for the longitudinal angle between the moon and the sun to increase by 12°. A lunar month consists of 30 tithis, whose start time and duration (19 to 26 hours) vary.

 

Tithi is also considered as the first phase or portion among the 16 phases of the Moon. The 15 days(First half of the Lunar Month), commencing from Amavasya (the last day of the dark half of a lunar month i.e. no moon or new moon day) to Pournima (Full moon), are called the Tithis of the Shukla-Paksha (Waxing phase) and the days commencing from Pournima (Full Moon day) to Amavasya (New Moon day) are called Krishna Paksha (the Waning phase). There are 30 Tithis in each lunar mont.

For example, at new moon (amavasya) the sun and the moon are separated by zero degrees. As they begin to separate the first tithi begins when the sun and the moon have separated by 12 degrees. The moon is now a tiny almost imperceptable sliver. The second tithi begins when they are separated by 24 degrees. The sliver is slightly larger. The third tithi begins when they have separated by 36 degrees. The digit of the moon is now clearly visible. And so it goes until the sun and moon have separated by 180 degrees. This tithi is called full moon, purnima. These first 15 tithis or phases of the moon make up the waxing phases of the moon which in Sanskrit this is called the sukla-paksa. This is the bright side of the lunar month. After purnima, full moon, the tithi begins again counting from one as the longitudanal separation between the sun and the moon decreases back to zero. This is called the waning phase of the moon or in Sanskrit, the krsna-paksa or dark side of the lunar month.

The tithis are sequentially numbered from both the points of the new moon as well as the full moon. In this way, the sukla-paksa ,beginning with the new moon (amavasya), is followed by the first tithi, then the second tithi, the third tithi and so on up to the 14th tithi. There is no 15th tithi. Instead, this tithi is called full moon (purnima). After the full moon, the waning phase (krsna-paksa) again begins with the first tithi, the second tithi, the third tithi and so on up to the fourteenth tithi followed by the new moon (amavasya). Afterwards the cycle repeats itself. In this way thirty tithis make up a lunar month, which is known as a masa or month. Some parts of India begin the month from the full moon whereas other parts begin the month from the new moon. Today, the lunar calendar is still in use throughout the world for Hindu religious purposes.

One of the greatest points of confusion between Hindu festival dates and the modern solar calendar is that the solar day begins at midnight whereas the lunartithi can begin at anytime of the solar day. For practical purposes, however, the tithi that is current at sunrise is taken as the prevailing tithi for the day.

Another aspect of the lunar calendar is that its twelve months based on the lunar days (tithis) contain about 354 days. Just like, every 4th year an extra day is added on the solar calendar to make up for the discrepancy in the earth’s orbit around the sun (leap year system), an extra month is added to the lunar calendar every 30 months. This leap-month (adika-masa) is generally inserted after the months of Asadha or Shravana and is called either a second Asadha or Shravana. Thus every second or third year contains 13 months in the lunar calendar. This of course contributes considerably to differences between the lunar and solar calendars. The consequences of these differences makes it hard to reconcile the dates from one calendar to the other without intricate calculations, especially in deciding the dates of various festivals. Your Lala Ramswaroop Ramnarayan Panchang serves the purpose of connecting the lunar calendar dates with that of solar calendar dates.